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Discussion Starter #21
IMO you need to ask yourself what type of riding and what environment you ride in.

Notice on the Walmart Rotors some of the openings or holes are rather large, certainly larger holes than OEM. Honda purposely made the rotors with small holes.

Off road rotors that are smooth (no holes) or have very small holes (like the 250R OEM) are intended for all around general riding, in all types of terrain, rocks, pebbles, desert, woods, ect...

Rotors with larger holes are more prone to binding, jamming, or complete failure if used in terrain containing a lot of pebbles, rocks, or any type of foreign matter that can lodge in between the Rotor & Brake Housing/pads.

Totally opened or scalloped rotors try to get way from possible binding by having very large openings, assuming rocks are not going to be big enough to lodge in the rotor, however; if you pay attention you will note factory teams went with no holes, totally smooth or very small hole rotors in all desert racing.

Carlos
The other thing with those big holes is that here in Ohio unless you are on a prepped track there is probably going to be mud and water, which wear out brake pads much more quickly when big holes are present. Witness pro MX bike racers switching to solid rotors for mud races.
 

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My brother put a “saw blade” cheapo on his shee. What a pos stay away. It won’t last street riding. Heats uneven and developed some bumps on it from pads. This has to changed now(went cheap now buying twice) We go to fast don’t buy cheap brake components.
image.jpg
 

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The problem with most of the lower cost rotors of any brand is they are not made from good material, not heat treated, nor properly ground. It is costly to make good rotors and process them through the proper procedures to insure a solid, strong and wear resistant rotor. In the USA you cannot purchase the material, machine, heat treat and grind for $100, therefore; the selling price must be much higher than $100 for a good rotor.

The BDT rotor in the picture is 100% made at BDT; Best Material, Machined, Heat Treated, and fully Ground. Not an inexpensive rotor, however; this rotor pictured is 5 years old, has multiple races on both TT & MX tracks, stops on the spot (way better stopping power than OEM), weighs 1/2 the weight of OEM, and shows hardly any wear.

64486


Carlos
 

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That saw blade rotor looks pretty cool! Don't get your fingers in it though!
 
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Rockymountain has the Galfer wave rotor for $90 and the tusk typhoon for $60. The galfer is laser cut precision ground tempered 420 series stainless steel. A ton of good reviews. The typhoon rotor is tempered precision ground stainless steel, but the description doesn't say if it was laser cut or stamped out. It also doesn't state what series of stainless steel is used. The typhoon also has a bunch of top notch reviews.
Loren
 

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Agreed on the Galfer's; I've used them for rear rotors prior to BDT making our own rotors, and liked them. Don't care for the Typhon. Streamline also makes nice rotors, at least they did a few years ago, not 100% sure today....all of these rotors are not made in the USA, most are made for these manufactures in Taiwan or China.

Since I don't purchase or have any BDT products made outside the USA, Made in USA Only, it is a real cost challenge to produce a top quality rotor from the Best Material, Machine, Laser Cut/Water Jet Cut, Heat Treated and Precision Ground. My cost in the USA alone is over $100.

Carlos
 

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Discussion Starter #29
So I've got two stock pad kits in hand. It is 451A0-HB9-670. From looking at my old pads (they are indeed EBCs) and several pictures of stock CR250 pads (different P/Ns) from '87-'96 I think the aftermarket manufacturers are just sending out their CR250 pads for 250Rs. CR250 brakes are legendary for their time so you can't really blame them. But something about the compound must be different for 250Rs between the tiny rotors as compared to the CRs, the fact that there are two and the additional weight of the ATV.

It's going to be a bit before I can run the bike. I'm also in the middle of a front suspension bushing replacement and painting the A-Arms. Also I took this time to rebuild the calipers so this won't be perfectly scientific. They were dragging a little and the pistons needed the grease gun trick to get them out (thank you .net for the suggestion). Compressed air was too weak.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
It does. And you'd think the cleanup would be really bad but it isn't. New clean grease is much easier to deal with than crusty old dirty grease.
 
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