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1986 250R
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got some time and got the project wrapped up, till I had one final task bleeding the rear brake.
What would cause fluid to shoot out a tight bleeder when the pedal is pushed down?

I thought the bleeder was bad that came with the rebuild kit so I ordered an oem Honda bleeder but it’s doing the same thing.
I don’t want to over torque it and cause it to strip and possibly shear like the last one.
I haven’t seen this before
 

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1986 250R
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I’m thinking that when I drilled the sheared bleeder out of the caliper that I may have gone too deep and hit or flattened out the taper where the bleeder would seat in the caliper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The fluid shoots right out of the bleeder valve as soon as you depress the pedal. The threads aren’t leaking.
I thought the shindy bleeder was bad that came with the rebuild kit, so I ordered a oem bleeder thinking that would be the fix, it’s doing the same.
I must have deformed the taper in the caliper and the bleeder valve isn’t seating properly, allowing fluid to flow out.
 

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Man that sucks! Even if you can grind the correct taper on a drill bit & clean up the seat you'll still have to disassemble the caliper to clean out the chips. If the problem is in the seat which it seems like it is than teflon won't keep fluid from bleeding out unfortunately.
 

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1986 250R
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I can’t think of what else would cause the bleeder to leak like that.
If those tapers don’t meet/match, then nothing will stop the fluid.

I could try a bolt and sealing washer to plug the bleeder hole, and bleed from the banjo but I may need a new caliper.
 

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One time I drilled through a carburetor thinking I was drilling through the airscrew cap (street bike so it had emissions). No, the airscrew cap was a bit further down. Had to get a carb body. Then it still ran the same! Found out later I tore a hole in the CV diaphragm with a screw while putting it back together. By this point I just bought a whole carb to end it.
 

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just for fun, run some sandpaper around in the hole, you may just have a burr or some baked on old fluid. you've probably already thought of this but if you didn't you should try before spending bucks.
 

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1986 250R
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I’m wondering if something like this would work?
If I seal the bleeder hole with a bolt and sealing washer and install this, I’ve seen them before never used them.
It’s a banjo bolt with bleeder on top.
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1986 250R
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Worth a try. But the bleeder us at the top of the caliper to so you can bleed out all the air. Might not be able to get all the air out if the bleeder is at the banjo.
I have a vacuum bleeder and a reverse bleeder to push the fluid through, works well on the fronts where any air gets pushed up through the line and bubbles into the resi. I’ll give it a shot before dropping money on a caliper.
 
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